Anarcho-Pessimism: The Lost Writings of Laurence Labadie

January 13th, 2015  |  Published in Things

anarcho-pessimism

Son of Joseph Labadie (of the famed Labadie Collection in Ann Arbor), Laurence Labadie out-distanced  his  father as a thinker and a polemicist. Laurence had the good luck to have been in consistent contact with some of the best writing by the American  individualist  anarchist  tradition. Through  a  series  of  ingenious  counterpoints  and elaborations he managed to make of it something entirely  new and  much  more  threatening.  The  vanished  anarchism  of  this  deep-rooted  radical  tradition was the mutinous wellspring into which Labadie dipped endlessly throughout his life, but Labadie is set off from both his father and his other individualist predecessors (like Benjamin Tucker) by his confrontational  tone,  his  sureness  of  purpose,  and  his  un-matched disillusionment regarding the utter emptiness  of  all  human  endeavors.

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How to Live Now or Never

January 13th, 2015  |  Published in Things

how to live

How to Live Now or Never collects exploratory and poetic works as a companion to The Impossible, Patience (Ardent Press), published earlier in the year. The two perform a dyadic acrobatic maneuver around the empty space where freedom, imagination, and possibility could exist in textual, temporal, and interpersonal relationships. Whereas The Impossible, Patience was serious play around nihilism and language, How to Live is a surreal anti-thesis “in the form of paradoxes, defending precisely the claims that seem most impossible or disagreeable to maintain.” This is a book with a stake in games—aesthetic, masque play, seductive.

I dream of summoning up an array of acts I denominate as seductive. They may be classed, by those who are so concerned, as non-coercive, in that arguably they seem to affect only the actor. These seductive acts are ultimately gentle demonstrations, modelizations of behavior that aim at a magnetic, passionate, attraction.

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Spiritual Journeys of an Anarchist

January 13th, 2015  |  Published in Things

spiritual journeysSpiritual Journeys is the story, by way of interview and narrative, of Wilson’s travels throughout the Middle East in the 1960s and 70s. This was a opium-fueled nomadic journey involving visits with Muslim heretics and other spiritual vagabonds through the possibility of Islam and a land we now only understand as reactive and terroristic (in the US-War-on-Terror sense of the word), therefore utterly mysterious and ideologically dangerous. While only forty years ago, Wilson’s journey could have been 400 years in the past. No Taliban, smart missiles, or drones, just drug-addled hippies and a no-longer-possible chance to travel the Overland Route with a fellow traveler.

Not only do we disdain tourism for its vulgarity and injustice, and wish to avoid any contamination (conscious or unconscious) from its viral influence, we also understand travel as an act of reciprocity rather than alienation. In other words, we don’t wish to merely avoid the negatives of tourism, but even more outrageously we desire positive travel, which we envision as a productive and mutually enhancing relationship between self and other, guest and host—a form of cross-cultural synergy in which the whole exceeds the sum of the parts.

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Hostis 1: A Journal of Cruelty

January 13th, 2015  |  Published in Things

hostis

Hostis is a negation. It emerges devoid of ethics, lacking any sense of democracy, and without a care for pre-figuring anything. Fed up with the search for a social solution to the present crisis, it aspires to be attacked wildly and painted as utterly black without a single virtue.

In thought, Hostis is the construction of incommensurability that figures politics in formal asymmetry to the powers that be.

In action, Hostis is an exercise in partisanship – speaking in a tongue made only for those that it wants to listen. This partisanship is neither the work of fascists, who  look  for  fights  to  give  their  limp  lives  temporary jolts of excitement, nor martyrs, who take hopeless stands to live the righteousness of loss. Hostis is the struggle to be dangerous in a time when antagonism is dissipated.

This is all because Hostis is the enemy.

The first 100 copies of this journal have been  printed with sandpaper covers (we couldn’t do more because it was chewing up our equipment!).

Table of contents

  • 1 A Short Introduction to the Politics of Cruelty
  • 33 Nice Shit for Everybody Global Shade
  • 37 An Enduring Passion for Criminality Tom Nomad and Gallus Stanig Mag
  • 57 ¿Ulrike?
  • 67 There Is a Third Thing taken from O Globo translated by Pepe Rojo
  • 73 Interlude III Cassandra Troyan

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What’s New with LBC – Winter 2015

January 12th, 2015  |  Published in Monthly updates

It was an amazing fall and a fantastic year. In November we visited the Southeast (including the Carrboro Anarchist Bookfair) and participated in the third annual East Bay Book and Conversation event in the nearby town of Oakland, CA. Several of our titles are raising the kinds of heated conversation we are hoping to have (the rest haven’t been discovered by the right people yet). This project of publishing modern anarchist ideas with the hope of inspiring the current and next generation of rabble-rousers is rewarding in-and-of-itself AND appears to be netting results, although perhaps not the ones expected.

We can’t keep some of our titles in print, we can’t fill wholesale orders fast enough, and we can’t keep all of the balls in the air long enough to change the world but we have officially completed three years of publishing a book a month, putting back into print a few neglected classics (like Freedom: My Dream and The Black Bloc Papers), collecting great content from the Internet (like canenero and I Saw Fire), and taking a few risks (Dictionary of Unhappiness.

We are Little Black Cart: Distribution, Editorial, and print shop.

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New Titles

How to Live Now or Never by Alejandro de Acosta

How to Live Now or Never collects exploratory and poetic works as a companion to The Impossible, Patience (Ardent Press), published earlier in the year. The two perform a dyadic acrobatic maneuver around the empty space where freedom, imagination, and possibility could exist in textual, temporal, and interpersonal relationships. Whereas The Impossible, Patience was serious play around nihilism and language, How to Live is a surreal anti-thesis “in the form of paradoxes, defending precisely the claims that seem most impossible or disagreeable to maintain.”

This is a book with a stake in games—aesthetic, masque play, seductive.

I dream of summoning up an array of acts I denominate as seductive. They may be classed, by those who are so concerned, as non-coercive, in that arguably they seem to affect only the actor. These seductive acts are ultimately gentle demonstrations, modelizations of behavior that aim at a magnetic, passionate, attraction.

Check out How to Live Now or Never by Alejandro de Acosta

Spiritual Journeys by Peter Lamborn Wilson

Spiritual Journeys is the story, by way of interview and narrative, of Wilson’s travels throughout the Middle East in the 1960s and 70s. This was a opium-fueled nomadic journey involving visits with Muslim heretics and other spiritual vagabonds through the possibility of Islam and a land we now only understand as reactive and terroristic (in the US-War-on-Terror sense of the word), therefore utterly mysterious and ideologically dangerous. While only forty years ago, Wilson’s journey could have been 400 years in the past. No Taliban, smart missiles, or drones, just drug-addled hippies and a no-longer-possible chance to travel the Overland Route with a fellow traveler.

Not only do we disdain tourism for its vulgarity and injustice, and wish to avoid any contamination (conscious or unconscious) from its viral influence, we also understand travel as an act of reciprocity rather than alienation. In other words, we don’t wish to merely avoid the negatives of tourism, but even more outrageously we desire positive travel, which we envision as a productive and mutually enhancing relationship between self and other, guest and host—a form of cross-cultural synergy in which the whole exceeds the sum of the parts.

Check out Spiritual Journeys by Peter Lamborn Wilson

Anarcho-Pessimism – The Lost Writings of Laurence Labadie

Son of Joseph Labadie (of the famed Labadie Collection in Ann Arbor), Laurence Labadie was a thinker and a polemicist. Laurence had the good luck to have been in consistent contact with some of the best writing by the American individualist anarchist tradition. Through a series of ingenious counterpoints and elaborations he managed to make of it something entirely new and much more threatening. The vanished anarchism of this deep-rooted radical tradition was the mutinous wellspring into which Labadie dipped endlessly throughout his life, but Labadie is set off from both his father and his other individualist predecessors (like Benjamin Tucker) by his confrontational tone, his sureness of purpose, and his un-matched disillusionment regarding the utter emptiness of all human endeavors.

Laurence Labadie (1898-1975) did stormy battle with socialists, communist anarchists, single taxers, leftists, Gesellites (explained later), social creditors, minarchists, and a host of others… By the mid-1960s, he’d refined his literary and analytic technique into something impressively spine-chilling and acidic—and it is these trenchant, hopeless writings that we have made visible and again available for foraging.

Check out Anarcho-Pessimism: The Lost Writings of Laurence Labadie

Recent LBC Titles

  1. Huye Hombre Huye: diary of a maximum security prisoner – A dramatic story of a prisoner who would not submit.
  2. Here… At the Center of the World in Revolt – A book about anarchist strategy, given the last decade of attack.
  3. Women of Plogoff – The story of the successful direct action campaign against a nuclear power plant in 1980 in Brittany, France.
  4. Dictionary of Unhappiness – A post-situationist art book in the vein of Ambrose Pierce’s Devil’s Dictionary.
  5. The Impossible, Patience – Alejandro de Acosta’s gift to us regarding language and nihilism.
  6. Black Bloc Papers – Finally the book about the North American history of this infamous tactic has arrived!
  7. Disruptive Elements – Extreme individualist French anarchism–this tome will befuddle expectation.
  8. I Saw Fire – Doug Gilbert reflects on the past decade of street struggle around nazis, immigration, and Occupy.
  9. canenero – A collection from the Italian publication, critical, Insurrectionary, and featuring the writing of Alfredo M. Bonanno and Massimo Passamani.

Our Journals

In 2014 we put out 5 (review, bastard, dc, insurgencies, hostis) brand new journals (and a few newspapers).

Hostis

Hostis is a negation. It emerges devoid of ethics, lacking any sense of democracy, and without a care for pre-figuring anything. Fed up with the search for a social solution to the present crisis, it aspires to be attacked wildly and painted as utterly black without a single virtue. In thought, Hostis is the construction of incommensurability that figures politics in formal asymmetry to the powers that be. In action, Hostis is an exercise in partisanship – speaking in a tongue made only for those that it wants to listen. This partisanship is neither the work of fascists, who look for fights to give their limp lives temporary jolts of excitement, nor martyrs, who take hopeless stands to live the righteousness of loss. Hostis is the struggle to be dangerous in a time when antagonism is dissipated. This is all because Hostis is the enemy.

Hostis was what Rome called enemies of the state, though it also means stranger. The term is inspired by barbarians, who are not understood by Imperial powers because they do not speak a recognized language and break civic norms through uncontrolled acts of violence. For more, see Crisso and Odoteo’s “Barbarian: The Disordered Insurgence,” an amazing 2003 Italian insurrectionist critique of Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri’s Empire, Michel Foucault’s Collège de France lecture “Society Must Be Defended” pages 194-208, and Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s two nomadology plateaus in A Thousand Plateaus.

Note: The first 100 copies of the journal Hostis will have a sandpaper cover. Party!

Check out Hostis #1: cruelty

Other Journals

Here are new items we are carrying that are worth taking a look at…

Upcoming Titles

  • The 2014 LBC Review:Tastes of some of our favorites from the year, as well as editorials on… What did we do? What did we do well? Why did we do it? All will be answered in this review of 2014…
  • The 30th Anniversary Edition of the Abolition of Work – with an introduction by Bruce Sterling. Bob’s contribution to our literary tradition and ideas around work republished for the first time in decades.
  • Spiritual Destinations the second of a pair of new/old titles from Peter Lamborn Wilson
  • Voyer, Post-Left Anarchist anthology, Art of the German autonomous movement, Communisation, and more, more, more!

How to Support LBC – Become an Accomplice

This quarter our accomplices are helping us finance a new cutter and consider a new national newspaper. If you like a vibrant and engaged anarchist press, please consider helping us by becoming an LBC Accomplice!

For $20 / month (domestic, $40 international) you get every new title we publish (over 50 since 2012), 20% off of every Little Black Cart distribution item, and we start you out with a free book or t-shirt of your choosing.

Here is how to learn more about becoming an LBC Accomplice

The rest

Want to help?

Are you in the Bay Area and would you like to help make LBC projects happen? Drop us a line.

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Send manuscript proposals to us at info@lbc

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Black Seed #2

October 10th, 2014  |  Published in Things

blackseed2

Black Seed is an anarchist paper in the tradition of Green Anarchy magazine (RIP) that presents through essays, images, stories, and poetry, green anarchist perspectives. Black Seed is a 32 page newspaper format biannual publication. This is the second issue.

Black Seed is a collectively-produced, print-only newspaper that is concerned with the larger questions of what green anarchy means as an idea, a conversation, and lived reality. We’re not interested in presenting a green anarchist ideology, but rather in creating a space to ask larger questions. This issue will expand the conversations begun in our first issue, while moving into new territory.

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Anarchist Survival Guide for Understanding Gestapo Swine Interrogation Mind Games

October 2nd, 2014  |  Published in Things

anarchist_survival_guide2

Required reading for any anarchist who may have to deal with police. Real life experiences from Harold Thompson, long may he be remembered.

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Uncivilised: the Dark Mountain Manifesto

October 2nd, 2014  |  Published in Things

uncivilised.dark mountain

Dark Mountain is a not-anarchist English (mostly literature) project that is remarkably in synch with current green anarchist thinking on the environment and the options of humans (see Black Seed and Desert).

This is their manifesto.

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Writings of Anarchist and Bank Robber Gabriel Pombo da Silva

October 2nd, 2014  |  Published in Things

gabriel_pombo_da_silva

From the age of 15 Gabriel began to expropriate banks with his closest companions. For these illegal acts he was imprisoned in Spain where he became an anarchist. Gabriel has served more than 25 years in prison, 14 of which have been in isolation. He does not identify as a prisoner let alone as a social prisoner. He has spent so much time inside because of his general attitude of insubordination and his escape attempt with Xose Tarrio Gonzalez, who was his very close friend. In 2004 and after Gabriel had served 3/4 of his sentence, he managed to get permitted day leave. On one of these, he fled to Germany along with another prisoner (Jose Fernandez Delgado), looking for other rebels to organize an escape plot to free another comrade in Spain. At a typical border control in Germany, they, along with a Belgian anarchist and Gabriel’s sister, are stopped. A shoot-out eventually ensues and hostages are taken–which ultimately leads to their arrest. Although no one was injured, Gabriel was convicted of attempted murder and kidnapping.

 

Another of the texts that should be required reading for anyone who might end up in prison (aka anyone), along with Harold Thompson’s “Anarchist Survival Guide for Understanding Gestapo Swine Interrogation Techniques” for the lessons it teaches about the realities of prison, and for the example of people who are not broken or bowed in the institutions created to keep us all in line, whether outside or in.

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Here… at the Center of the World in Revolt

October 2nd, 2014  |  Published in Things

here_at_the_center_of_the_world

 

Here is the story of the composition of revolt broken into theory and practice. It is anarchist theory for the 21st century.
The opposition of individual and community is a false one, for every model of individual implies a community, and every community an individual. The Western individual is the building block of a community of commodities. The community of the homogeneous, disciplined revolutionists breaks down into well trained militants who will follow their leaders through any number of defeats. By abandoning blueprints as an artifact and rediscovering visions as an activity, we can reclaim the pancentric society that has room for all of us. Every single one of us is the center of society and therefore the master of our own activity, but because we understand ourselves not as separate individuals but as nodes of unending flows that only exist through our relationships, solidarity and mutual aid will be the most obvious organizing principles. Finally, the individualist and the communist can end their bitter war. The community will be regained through the complicity of all our individual alienations. We will destroy everything, but only so we can mend this fracture.
Pick up your weapons: it is time to heal!

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